Performing vs. Thinking    

Is tennis difficult?

Most players at every level would agree.

Nonsense. It has been made difficult.

I have established some astounding principles that make tennis a much easier sport to perform.

One of those tenets is that human beings can play tennis more efficiently at a simpler level where feel and instinct are enhanced and thought is minimized.

Maximized are the ability to be and stay in present time, leading into perceptions and awareness not considered normal for an individual, such as the slowdown of time.

Although dismissed as too simplistic by critics in the fields of tennis coaching and tennis sports science, the essence of this modus operandi comprises “tennis of the future”, reflecting the performance of top pros and very young children who have not yet been conditioned to “think”.

Human beings, in general, love sports and the feel of conquering non-harmful physical challenges with exertion yet ease. They also want to excel at acquiring knowledge in how to transform a challenge into a win, on how to make a seemingly difficult task into a pleasant accomplishment, a fulfilling experience, something easy to achieve.

Using these principles we can anticipate the popularity and massive incursion of the public into a sport that enhances the sense that a serene, relaxed way of playing aligns best their inner feel of oneness between the spirit and the thrill of experiencing and mastering the physical universe.

Many of these principles in tennis were researched after learning the discoveries of L. Ron Hubbard, who applied engineering to the humanities and philosophical and religious beliefs, and formulated scientific laws in realms never quantified before.

Tennis adepts will be able to experience, through these techniques, how to be a serene observer and at the same time a causation expert, where one has a direct, easy, simple and most natural connection between one’s actions, effort and the results obtained.

Oscar Wegner, TennisTeacher.com

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